FULL FIBRE

How Fibre Works

Providing the fastest connection

Talk-Talk-Website-Header-Image-7.jpg

There are three main types of broadband connection that link the local telephone exchange to your house:

ADSL

ADSL (asymmetric digital subscriber line) uses copper cables to a street-level cabinet or junction box and on to the house.

FTTC

FTTC (fibre to the cabinet) uses a faster fibre optic cable to the cabinet, but then copper cable from there to the house.

FTTP

FTTP (fibre to the premises) uses a fibre optic cable to connect to households without using any copper cable.

  • ADSL@3x3.png

    ADSL

    Copper ADSL broadband has been the backbone of the internet infrastructure, as it's used in the telephone network across the UK and goes into most homes.

    But it's old and slower than fibre optic cable, which is made from glass or plastic and uses pulses of light to transmit data.


  • FTTC@3x3.png

    FTTC

    Copper ADSL broadband has been the backbone of the internet infrastructure, as it's used in the telephone network across the UK and goes into most homes.

    But it's old and slower than fibre optic cable, which is made from glass or plastic and uses pulses of light to transmit data.

  • FTTP@3x2.png

    FTTP

    FTTP connections though are the fastest, as there is a seamless fibre line all the way from the exchange to your house. It loses very little if no speed a long the way and is much more reliable than the previous technology. It also allows many more people to use it at a time (our Eero router which we offer with Full Fibre packages allows up to 75 devices to run off it).